Okay!!!! Everyone just calm down.
We all know these are 1860s & 1870s sugar bowls missing their lids.
But some like to think of them as goblets meant to drink
buttermilk from, so don't get your knickers in a knot over it.

THIS IS A NEWS ALERT!!!!! Larry Wilson has just noted that these
oversized drinking vessels make perfect wine goblets.... they don't have to be
refilled so often. One of the great things about EAPG... it is so easily 're-purposed'!!


"Are you a Milk Cow? or a Butter Cow? or a Buttermilk Cow?"
     First lets talk about buttermilk in the olden days - 140 or so years ago! Nowadays we can mostly only buy "cultured" (made under civil conditions) buttermilk. But our fore-families got theirs straight from the cow. Buttermilk was what was left over after Ma & Grandma churned the butter out of milk from old Bessie.
     To get it, they let fresh milk 'set' for a day or so. Then they would skim off the cream that had risen to the top.
      By the time they had saved up enough cream to make churning worthwhile, it would have soured a little due to the bacteria in it. Remember, they didn't even have an 'ice box'. So they'd churn the butter (I'll leave out the gory details of all that hard work). When it turned yellow and lumpy, Voila! they'd pour off the, uh, buttermilk!
      And now, lets talk about the "buttermilk goblets".  I know that some pattern glass folks are all out of sorts because I'm calling these buttermilk goblets. But that's what lots of folks, especially from Texas, call them & being an Okie, I'm with them. The truth is - all but one are
actually EAPG sugar bowls missing their lids.
      Many, but not all, sugar bowls made during the 1860s & 70s were on a pedestal & shaped like these. And (most of) their matching creamers would have applied handles. So you can date these forms pretty closely.
      All of these goblets are between 5- 6" tall, & 4" outside diameter at the top, give or take, & unless noted otherwise are undamaged & non-flint.
If you have spare lids to any of these pieces for sale, please let us know.
To learn how to purchase from PatternGlass.com, click HERE
We have LOTS of covered sugar bowls and later sugar bowls without lids HERE.
ARGUS aka HOTEL or BARREL ARGUS was
made by Bakewell, Pears. It is Flint from the
'60s & '70s & $75.
BLEEDING HEART is
a product of the King
& Sons Glass Co. ca.
1875. We have 2 of
these @ $60 each

FAIRFAX STRAWBERRY
aka Early Strawberry
made by Bryce Walker
ca. 1870s.
$65


FORGET-ME-NOT IN SCROLL is an obscure pattern by a maker unknown to us in the
1870s.    $46
DIAMOND SUNBURST
is an 1870s Bryce
Walker #77 pattern. It
has a chip on the
underside of the base. $45

FLAT DIAMOND
pattern was made by Richards & Hartley in the 1880s. $55


GRAPE WITH VINE, EARLY - 5" tall & 4" OD at top.  1870s by maker unknown. $48 HERRINGBONE
was made by a glass
company unknown to us.
It has a base bruise. $48

LEAF & DART is
an 1875 pattern by
Richards & Hartley.
We have 4 @ $45 each.


PALMETTE is a large & popular pattern but we don't know who made it
or exactly when. We have
3 of these @ $55 each.
POWDER & SHOT is a famous Boston &
Sandwich Glass Co.
pattern ca 1870s. It is
Flint & very rare in
milk glass.$135.

PRISM aka FINE
PRISM is another
pattern whose maker
is unknown to us. It is beautiful bell-tone Flint. We have 2@ $75 each.


RIBBED PALM is an
1860s Flint pattern by
McKee Bros. We have 2 @ $75 each.
SCROLL aka STIPPLED SCROLL is an 1880s
pattern made by Geo. Duncan & Sons or maybe Ripley. We have 2 @
$55 each.

TEXAS BULLSEYE
aka Notched Bullseye
is a Bryce Bros pattern from the 1870s.  See a better picture of the pattern HERE.
It is  $36.


STAR ROSETTED aka SNOWFLAKE aka
GENERAL GRANT is
a McKee Bros 1875
pattern. $75
STIPPLED GRAPE & FESTOON was made
by Doyle & Co.
ca. 1870s.
$65

STIPPLED IVY was
possibly made by the
Lancaster Glass Co.
ca 1880. We have 3
@ $65 each.



TIDY aka RUSTIC aka DRAPERY VARIANT,
a cute pattern made
by McKee Bros
ca. 1880. We have
3 @ $55 each.
PRISM BAND
A pattern shown only in Metz as far as we know. It has a wafer connection. Maker is unknown per Welker.
Probably 1860s.
$45

WASHINGTON
CENTENNIAL pattern

was made by Gillinder & Sons ca. 1876 for the
100th anniversary celebration of the USA.
It has a tiny bit of discoloration but is without damage to the glass. $48


The prices above do not include the cost of shipping & insurance.
We have LOTS of covered sugar bowls and later sugar bowls without lids HERE.